Home > Bible, Jesus, Lord's Prayer, Uncategorized > Who He is. Who we are not.

Who He is. Who we are not.


****

A man went on a nature
walk. A bear began to chase him, so he climbed a tree.

As he was climbing he
slipped down into the bear’s arms.

He prayed “Lord let
this be a Christian bear.”

The bear said “Lord
thank you for this food.”

****

The last message that we’ll focus on is
on a part of Jesus’ model prayer that many of us have memorized.
However, if you read a translation other than the KJV, you’ll find
that its not there.  Our focus is on Matthew 6:13B.  It’s often
referred to as a doxology.  Simply put, most scholars agree that this
ending verse was not spoken by Jesus as He ended this prayer of
example.

I could go into all the details, but
for the sake of keeping this a short article, I’ll just say the
following things.  The earliest (oldest) and most trusted documents
used to translate our present day Bible do not contain this part of
verse 13.  However, some old documents and texts…not as old but
still trusted as reliable…do contain it.  Therefore, most of our
Bible translations don’t contain it, but some have placed it in this
part of Matthew with a footnote saying something like “not
contained in earliest texts.”

Ok…what’s this mean for us?  Do we
forget about it or dig in?  I vote for the dig in.  You may remember
that when we first began this study on this prayer, I wrote about our
approach to God…and how a proper approach is explained by Jesus in
the first words of this prayer.  Jesus’ words give us a humble
approach, lifting up God’s holy name while signifying who His is and
what we are not.  He is holy and in heaven.  We are in need of
forgiveness and creatures needing forgiveness.

This doxology, as many call verse 13,
was probably an ending to prayer…any prayer, that Jews commonly
recited before saying the Amen.  That’s all.  Jesus, being a Jew
himself, had probably recited this doxology or something similar many
times as He prayed in the Temple.  One article I read stated that
Jesus probably didn’t say it hear because it was basically understood
among the Jewish people He was talking to.

So if this is the case, should we throw
it out?  I don’t think so.  This phrase is simply a reminder of what
is at the beginning of this model prayer.  It is also a phrase
similar to passages found in other parts of the Bible such as 1
Chronicles 29:11.

When we say it as we recite the prayer,
we are ending our prayer much like many Hebrews/Jewish people end any
prayer they are praying.  Good thing?  Here’s how I see it.  As Jesus
taugh us a proper approach to the Creator of all things, we here have
a proper ending.  We simply close the prayer restating who He is and
what is His and in doing so, our position in all things.  The Kingdom
is His.  All the power is His.  And all glory should be given to Him.
Why not say this as a closing reminder for us?

The final word is the common ‘Amen.’
Have you ever wondered where that came from?  Why do we always say
“amen” at the end of our prayers?  Well, it simply is a Hebrew
word that means ‘so be it.’  It isn’t just a period at the end of the
last sentence you speak.  It is a word of affirmation.  In this
prayer, it means…my paraphrase of course…All is yours Lord, and I
agree with that truth.

Friends, this is just another reminder
of who we talk to when we pray.  It’s another reminder of our
nature…sinful.  It is a reminder of what we’re a part of and our
purpose.  We are a part of the Kingdom and we we to give all the
glory to Him.

Repeated Questions for reflection:

  • How do you approach God in your
    prayers?
  • Do your words match your
    heart/soul language?  Meaning…is your heart as humble as the words
    you repeat from Jesus’ model?
  • If you don’t feel it yet, act it
    out as though you do…most times the feelings follow.

PS – If you’re familiar with the
Narnia movies, I’m reminded of the small Narnian who Lucy helps save
from drowning in one of the movies.  At first, all he knows of Aslan
the Lion (the character symbolizing God in the story) is from
stories.  As he gets to know the 4 kings and queens of Narnia,
representing us in many ways, he begins to understand that they have
seen and been with Aslan…but not yet trusting…still he likes them
and has given his duty to them.  By the end of the movie, he believes
and even comes face to face with the Creator and is bowing humbly as
he finally realizes the truth.  Act as though this is true, even
though you don’t feel it yet, and slowly God does reveal.  Now this
doesn’t mean that simply reciting this prayer is going to get you
closer to God.  What I mean is that God will know whether you are
truly searching for Him and reward you adequately and in His time.

love, serve, spread the Word,

ed

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